Posts tagged vegan lunchbox


Mashed Cauliflower with Lemony Brussels Sprouts

Ingredients

  • 2 cups cauliflower
  • 2 cups Brussels sprouts
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ cup milk or milk alternative
  • 1 lemon
  • 3 spinach leaves

Instructions

  1. Prepare cauliflower: remove leaves and stem from cauliflower and cut into pieces.
  2. Prepare Brussels sprouts: remove the outer leaves, cut off the stem, and cut in half.
  3. Bring small amount of water to a boil in saucepan with steamer basket.
  4. Reduce heat to medium.
  5. Add Brussels sprouts to steamer basket and cover. Steam Brussels sprouts for 5 to 10 minutes until tender. Remove and set aside.
  6. Add cauliflower to steamer basket and cover. Steam cauliflower for 10 to 15 minutes until soft enough to mash.
  7. Remove cauliflower and mash with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and ¼ cup milk.
  8. Arrange Brussels sprouts over mashed cauliflower.
  9. Drizzle lemon dressing (recipe below) over cooked vegetables and garnish with spinach.

Dressing

  1. Squeeze the juice of lemon and mix with the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil.
  2. Whisk together.

Smokin’ Ground Tempeh

Smokin' Ground Tempeh

Looking for a healthy meat substitute that is both easy to prepare and satisfying? Consider trying tempeh, a fermented soybean food that is packed with nutrition. Highly versatile, tempeh can serve as a hearty main ingredient in a wide variety of tasty vegetarian meals. Enjoy this delicious recipe in a wrap, put it on top of your favorite salad, or pasta.

Amy Gilman, Dietetic Student
Yield: 24 -1/2 cup servings

Ingredients: Tempeh

  • 2-8 oz pkg Tempeh (Soy by Lightlife®)
  • 2-6 oz pkg Smoked Tempeh Strips (Lightlife®)
  • 6 cups Water
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • ¼ tsp Salt

Ingredients: Sauce

  • 2 Tbsp Safflower oil
  • 6 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1 large Onion, chopped
  • 2 Chipotle peppers, finely chopped
  • 1 Tbsp Adobo sauce (reserved from chipotle peppers)
  • 1 large Jalapeno, finely chopped (optional for extra heat)
  • 1 small can Tomato paste
  • 1 cup Vegetable broth
  • 1 Tbsp Chili powder
  • 1 Tbsp Paprika
  • 1 Tbsp Brown mustard seeds
  • 1 Tsp Fresh ground pepper
  • 1 Tsp Salt
  • 1 large can Diced tomatoes
  • 1 can Stewed tomatoes
  • ½ tsp Liquid smoke
  • ½ cup Cilantro, finely chopped

Directions:

  1. Remove tempeh from packages.
  2. Add 6 cups of water, bay leaf, and ¼ tsp salt to 10-quart stock pot. Bring to boil.
  3. Boil the 2 packages of tempeh (soy) for 10 minutes in salted water.
  4. Remove, place in a large mixing bowl and let cool.
  5. Once cool – grind all of the tempeh in a food processor and then set aside.
  6. Prepare ingredients for the sauce: mince the garlic, chop the onion, chop two chipotle peppers from the can of adobo sauce, and chop the jalapeno.
  7. In a 10-quart stock pot add oil and heat on medium heat.
  8. Add garlic, onion, chipotle peppers, adobo sauce, jalapeno, and tomato paste. Cook until the onion starts to become translucent (the goal is to infuse the flavors into the oil and to cook out the raw taste of the tomato paste). Mix with wooden spoon.
  9. After approximately 3-5 minutes, add the vegetable broth and mix until a soupy consistency forms.
  10. Add chili powder, paprika, brown mustard seeds, fresh ground pepper, salt, diced tomatoes, and stewed
    tomatoes and mix thoroughly.
  11. Bring the temperature of the mixture up slightly above medium, to the point just before a simmer.
  12. Add liquid smoke and mix thoroughly (it is very important to mix this ingredient all the way through the
    mixture). This will add a nice, hickory smoke flavor.
  13. Add tempeh to mixture; bring to a simmer and cover.
  14. Stir mixture every few minutes to prevent it from sticking to the bottom of the pot.
  15. Cook for 30 minutes. Taste mixture and adjust seasoning as you see fit (adding more chili powder, paprika, salt
    and/or pepper).
  16. Cook for another 30 minutes.
  17. Add cilantro to the mixture – mix thoroughly and let cool.
  18. Enjoy your tasty dish!

Nutritional Information (1/2 cup):

Calories: 100; Fat: 4 g; Saturated fat: 0 g; Cholesterol: 0 mg; Sodium: 390 mg; Carbohydrates: 10 g; Fiber: 3 g; Sugar: 3 g; Protein: 7 g; Vitamin A: 10% DV; Vitamin C: 20% DV; Calcium: 2% DV; Iron: 15% DV


Lunch tips for kids of all ages.

For little kids – They love to open small containers. I bought some 2 ounce containers with lids and used them for a few slices of cucumbers, nut butter or tofu spread for dipping baby carrots, 2 small ginger snaps, a couple of grape tomatoes, grapes and a couple of walnuts. Every one was like a small present.

For children 6 to 10 – School lunch is short. Some schools have a snack time or a snack that can be eaten while in class. Sandwiches are great, but everyone wants hot food in the cold weather. Heat up a thermos with hot water. Heat up a soup or stew at the last minute. Drain the thermos. The soup or stew will stay hotter in the heated thermos. Put a napkin between the thermos and any cold items. Don’t forget something crunchy to go with it – crackers or celery work fine. For the snack – a small container of apple sauce with cinnamon, snack bar or celery with nut butter and raisins work great.

For children 11-13 – Have them make lunch with you. They are beginning to need their independence. It will also get them in the kitchen and learning how to feed themselves. Set some guidelines – protein source, grain, fruit and drink. With the fall weather, you can alternating soy milk with local cider. If they have after school activities pack a snack and include water to drink.

For Teenagers – getting them to eat lunch at all is a good trick. However, either make it at home with guidelines or ask what’s available at school. Most schools have a card to swipe for purchased lunch. You set the cash amount for the card. Many food service directors will allow for specifics on purchases, such as “school lunch items only.” This means they can purchase any items designated as lunch for the school and not a la carte items such as french fries. Have your teen make their lunch. They can shop with you or make their own list of foods for lunch. Again, you are teaching them ready to feed themselves. If they have after school activities pack a snack that includes a beverage so they stay hydrated.

Hungry kids are grumpy kids. At every age, packing or purchasing enough food and drinks is the key. When you including your children in the process the food packed will more likely be eaten.