Crunch into Crispy Collard Chips

Tired of snacking on potato chips? Need something to munch on during the day without adding a lot of Calories to your diet? Try Crispy Collard Green Chips by Megann Harris, RD, LD! This crunchy recipe is rich in Vitamin A and Vitamin C. A dehydrator is recommended to help completely dry these super-thin chips to just the right crispness. Store in an airtight container when done to help chips stay crunchy and enjoy!

Crispy-Collard-Chips
Crispy Collard Green Chips
by Megann Harris, RD, LD

About Meredith Hink MS, RD, CD

I am a Corporate Dietitian with a foodservice distribution company. My professional areas of interest include food safety and sanitation, food marketing, food law, and vegetarian nutrition. In my spare time I am an avid food photographer and enjoy spending time with my husband and two dogs.

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2 Responses to Crunch into Crispy Collard Chips

  1. Sue Hewitt says:

    My daughter says with only quinoa, buckwheat, soy I do not get “quality”
    protein. I say they have all 8 amino acids. I do not intend to become a
    meat-eater to get “high quality” protein. Am I safe?

    • Thank you for your quesion, protein is one of the many myths of plant-based diets. Your daughter is correct in that only a few plant foods by themselves contain all essential amino acids but when do we just eat one food all day? It is actually very easy to consume enough protein on a plant-based diet, by choosing eats a variety of foods throughout the day. Our bodies create a pool of the amino acids we eat and then uses them as needed. Almost all foods contain some protein (with the exception of alcohol, sugar, and fat). Good sources of protein include: legumes (lentils, beans, peas), soy-foods (tofu, tempeh, edamame), seitan, meat substitutes (veggie burgers, plant-based crumbles), milk (dairy and non-dairy), nuts, seeds, grains (rice, millet, quinoa), bread, and vegetables.
      Protein requirements can be met when a variety of plant foods are eaten and overall energy needs are met. In addition all of the essential amino acids can be eaten from a variety of foods throughout the day and there is no need to ‘combine proteins’ at the same meal.
      To read more about vegetarian diet myths – check out our Resource on Vegetarian Diet Myths in our Frequently Asked Questions under the Resources tab.
      If you want to verify your food intake use our Find a Registered Dietitian feature and schedule a visit.

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